how-liver-effects-skin-health

Want Healthy Skin? Start with Your Liver

Did you know that your liver is directly connected to skin function? While it is, typically, known for breaking down the alcohol in your body, the liver also plays a major role in the health of your skin. In fact, dermatologists are discovering that skin conditions can be early signs of internal issues or diseases.

Signs Your Liver Is Not Healthy

A liver that is not functioning properly can lead to acne, dry, itchy, and even sagging skin. What may seem like a simple rash can be a sign of liver disease. Here are a few signs that may indicate your liver is not healthy:

Itchy Skin

That itchy skin may not just be from a bug bite or dry skin. When there is bile present in the blood stream, causers by liver damage, itchy skin can occur. This can happen if the bile duct is blocked and causes the bile to flow back into the blood stream.

 

 

 

 

Spider Angiomas

Spider Angiomas are small, spider-like veins that are visible under the skin. A poor functioning liver that isn’t metabolizing your hormones can lead to higher levels of estrogen, causing these “spider veins” to appear on the legs or face.

 

 

 

 

Bruising

Bruising easily may not sound like a big deal but it can mean that you have deeper issues than just being sensitive. There are proteins that your blood needs to clot and if those aren’t being produced because of an unhealthy liver then this can lead to bruising easily after being hurt.

 

 

 

 

Bad Breath

No, you didn’t forget to brush your teeth this morning! Bad breath can be a major indicator of liver damage. Also known as foetor hepaticus, bad breath causes by high levels of dimethyl sulphide happens when you suffer from liver cirrhosis.

 

 

 

 

Acne

Acne is caused by both your hormones and your diet. What you eat, and your overall health can cause acne outbreaks. One of the many functions of your liver is to cleanse your blood of toxins. If your liver is not detoxifying your blood the way it is supposed to, the toxins find an alternative method of secretion, which can be the skin.

 

 

 

 

Red Palms

Palmar erythema, or red, burning, and itching palms, can be a sign of liver damage. This typically occurs because of irregular hormone levels in your blood.

A disorder called primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) can also cause itchy, red palms. It affects the bile ducts that connect the liver to the stomach. When bile travels between the stomach and liver, it builds up in the liver, and causes damage and scarring.

 

  

 

Jaundice (Yellow Skin & Eyes) 

Jaundice is a condition where the skin, mucous membranes, and sclera (the whites of the eyes) turn yellow. This occurs because of high levels of a yellow-orange bile pigment called bilirubin. This fluid is secreted by the liver.

Symptoms of Jaundice include fever, chills, change in the color of your skin, abdominal pain, and flu-like symptoms.

 

 

 

How to Clear Up Your Skin

Clearing up your skin should start from the inside. Since everything that we consume is processed through the liver, it is important to be mindful of what we put in our bodies. Here are a few ways to help clear up your skin starting with your liver health:

  • Cut down on alcohol consumption
  • Remove inflammatory foods from your diet (processed, fried, etc.)
  • Eat healthy fats
  • Exercise (sweat can remove toxins from the body)
  • Do not smoke

Fibronostics is committed to leveraging the benefits of technology to improve lives, and deliver high-quality, life-improving disease education, evaluation and monitoring. For more information contact us via email, or by phone at 1-888-552-1603. 

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Sources:

  1. Skin can show first signs of some internal diseases
  2. Why are my palms itchy?
  3. Adult Jaundice
  4. Does the secret to clear skin lie in your liver?

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